Modern Family Matters

Alternative Options for Pursuing Your Family Law Case During COVID-19

May 26, 2020 with Landerholm Family Law Season 1 Episode 2
Modern Family Matters
Alternative Options for Pursuing Your Family Law Case During COVID-19
Chapters
Modern Family Matters
Alternative Options for Pursuing Your Family Law Case During COVID-19
May 26, 2020 Season 1 Episode 2
with Landerholm Family Law
  • Lewis Landerholm, Founding Attorney of Landerholm Family Law, discusses the various options available to those who would like to pursue their family law case in spite of court delays due to Covid-19.
  • It’s projected that there's going to be a large wave of cases coming through in the next few months when everybody does decide to file, so getting your place in line and starting the process now is important.
  • While the courts are trying to navigate the pandemic with the State’s mandates and restrictions, they are eager to get things moving and provide alternative options so that people can move their cases forward.
  • There are outside and remote options available to those who want to move forward with their family law case but may not be able to get a court hearing. The courts are going to be putting pressure on attorneys and parties to use these outside options, such as utilizing reference judges, judicial settlement conferences, mediation, and remote hearings. 
  • Other industry professionals and services, such as therapists, arbitrators, supervised visitation, appraisers, house-movers, mediators, financial and tax planners, etc. are available at remote capacities. We have referral sources that we are happy to connect you with if needed. 
  • Coming up with creative options, being as agreeable as possible, and clients being willing to communicate with their opposing party to agree on alternative options, are going to be key in moving cases moving forward so that clients can get what they want without bogging down the system. 
  • In the event of an emergency and immediate court intervention, a client can still obtain a restraining order, and in extreme circumstances, an immediate danger order. If there is threat of a child being removed from their regular routine, status quo orders can still be entered in place.
  • The sudden and forced shift to go remote has helped to shake the old school mentality of “this is the way it has to go”. The courts, attorneys, and other professionals in the family law industry are rewriting how it has to go now, and there will be positive changes that will come out of this in the long run.
  • When you decide that it’s the right time to move forward with your family law case, we can help you. We're prepared to help you embrace all of these new, alternative tools that we have and try to solve the problem as efficiently and appropriately as we can. You can contact our office at (503) 227-0200.


Opciones para Continuar Con su Caso de Derecho de Familia Durante la COVID-19

  • Lewis Landerholm, abogado fundador de Landerholm Family Law, analiza las diversas opciones disponibles para aquellos que deseen continuar con su caso de derecho de familia a pesar de las demoras del tribunal debido la Covid-19.


Show Notes Transcript
  • Lewis Landerholm, Founding Attorney of Landerholm Family Law, discusses the various options available to those who would like to pursue their family law case in spite of court delays due to Covid-19.
  • It’s projected that there's going to be a large wave of cases coming through in the next few months when everybody does decide to file, so getting your place in line and starting the process now is important.
  • While the courts are trying to navigate the pandemic with the State’s mandates and restrictions, they are eager to get things moving and provide alternative options so that people can move their cases forward.
  • There are outside and remote options available to those who want to move forward with their family law case but may not be able to get a court hearing. The courts are going to be putting pressure on attorneys and parties to use these outside options, such as utilizing reference judges, judicial settlement conferences, mediation, and remote hearings. 
  • Other industry professionals and services, such as therapists, arbitrators, supervised visitation, appraisers, house-movers, mediators, financial and tax planners, etc. are available at remote capacities. We have referral sources that we are happy to connect you with if needed. 
  • Coming up with creative options, being as agreeable as possible, and clients being willing to communicate with their opposing party to agree on alternative options, are going to be key in moving cases moving forward so that clients can get what they want without bogging down the system. 
  • In the event of an emergency and immediate court intervention, a client can still obtain a restraining order, and in extreme circumstances, an immediate danger order. If there is threat of a child being removed from their regular routine, status quo orders can still be entered in place.
  • The sudden and forced shift to go remote has helped to shake the old school mentality of “this is the way it has to go”. The courts, attorneys, and other professionals in the family law industry are rewriting how it has to go now, and there will be positive changes that will come out of this in the long run.
  • When you decide that it’s the right time to move forward with your family law case, we can help you. We're prepared to help you embrace all of these new, alternative tools that we have and try to solve the problem as efficiently and appropriately as we can. You can contact our office at (503) 227-0200.


Opciones para Continuar Con su Caso de Derecho de Familia Durante la COVID-19

  • Lewis Landerholm, abogado fundador de Landerholm Family Law, analiza las diversas opciones disponibles para aquellos que deseen continuar con su caso de derecho de familia a pesar de las demoras del tribunal debido la Covid-19.


Intro: 

Welcome to Modern Family Matters, a podcast hosted by Steve Altishin, our Director of Client Partnerships here at Landerholm Family Law. We are devoted to exploring topics within the realm of family law that matter most to you. Our discussions will cover a wide range of both legal and personal issues that accompany family law matters. We strongly believe that life events such as marriages, divorces, re-marriages, births, adoptions, children, growing up, growing older, illnesses and deaths do not dissolve a family. Rather, they provide the opportunity to reconfigure and strengthened family dynamics in healthy and positive ways. With expertise from qualified attorneys and professional guests, we hope that our podcasts will help provide answers, clarity, and guidance for the better tomorrow for you and your family. Without further ado, your host, Steve Altishin

Steve Altishin (01:11):

Welcome everyone to our Facebook live broadcast. My name is Steve Altishin, director of client partnerships here at Landerholm Family Law, and I'm here with Lewis Landerholm. Lewis is the founding partner of Landerholm Family Law and is here today with me to talk about moving your case forward in today's environment.

Before we start. I want to encourage anyone listening to this live broadcast to submit any questions you have and we'll try our best to answer them at the end of the broadcast. Additionally, if you're interested in learning more about family law topics, we've started a podcast called modern family matters. These podcasts will cover a range of topics, such as divorce, and custody, adoption, and estate planning. You can get updates about new episodes on our Facebook page, Instagram and the Apple store. 

 

So Lewis, I see this question all the time: what's the use of filing for divorce now, or a custody change or an enforcement of a judgment? I mean, the courts are closed. It won't go anywhere. How do we answer that?

Lewis Landerholm (02:11):

Well, I think that's a good question, Steve, just from the standpoint that we don't know that much, and the state just came out with some new, less restrictive measures in some of the counties. So yeah, we're kind of waiting to see right now. Also, what we have seen up to this point is that the courts really do want to get started moving with certain cases and certain hearings.

Initially, when all of this came to pass, we saw all of our hearings that were scheduled from about mid-March through June get rescheduled and pushed out. And we're still waiting on some of those dates, but the word on the street is that we are going to see some of our family law cases getting prioritized behind say, criminal law and some of the more emergency type orders.

So while the courts are trying to navigate this with the States mandates and the States restrictions, they do want to get things moving so that we can actually help people move their cases forward.

Steve Altishin (03:18):

It seems to me that this is an opportunity now to really think about moving forward, and kind of get in the front of the line. What I see around is that there are attorneys and people that are reluctant to use the new system. They either don't have the technology, or they aren’t up with the court rules. And so they're still in the mindset of, “well, let's just wait until trials start”, and that could be a year from now. So I really like the idea of trying to move forward, and being innovative. And so how can we do that? How can we use what we've got in technology and how we've got ourselves set up to work with the court system with petitioning, filing motions, doing modifications, doing enforcement decrease? Can we still do all those things now?

Lewis Landerholm (04:10):

Yeah. I think trials where we need evidence and where we need witnesses are going to be the most difficult for the courts to figure out. I know other States have been trying, Michigan, Florida have been doing, and I know that Oregon has been doing some of them too, where they are trying to do remote hearings. The challenge is trying to deal with the difficulties of evidentiary issues, and witness testimony. And so I think what we're going to see is, well, our goal is to move our cases and move our client's cases along as efficiently as possible. So we're definitely going to embrace all of the technological advantages to do that. We will get into court as quickly as we can.

I think the courts are doing things that are a little creative as well. There are, outside of just the court options, options that we use all the time, even outside of this time, which would be, if we don't want to wait for a judge, which right now we're anticipating the wait time to be, like you said, a year. So I could see using judicial settlement conferences a lot more. Judicial settlement conferences, for those of you who don't know, are when we go to a different judge than we were assigned to, to actually talk to them about the case, give them the facts. And then that other judge can make recommendations or try to settle the case. The other options that we use all the time are attorney assisted mediation, where we will hire a retired judge typically to come in and help us work on the impasse and work on coming up with an agreement for clients so that we can move their case along.

There's even going to be more use of a reference judge. And a reference judge is essentially a judge for hire--kind of like an arbitrator would be-- somebody who we take our case to. And we submit to allowing them to make a ruling in the case so that we don't have to wait a year. We don't have to wait 14 months. So there are a lot of options out there and they're just going to become more prevalent as the court system gets even more contentious and backed up.

Steve Altishin (06:18):

Wow, the court system could get more contentious though. That'll be something, right? One thing you mentioned, what I've noticed, and what's great is that we've got remote mediators that we can refer clients out to, that we can work with. We've got several. So they're ready to go. Remote arbitrators, same thing, remote reference judges, all of these kinds of services can all be done remotely.

We don't have to worry about any of that problem. So they're not backlogged and we can get to them and kind of move our case forward because they've all set up remotely. They all can do video. Even on the arbitrary, they can take video evidence. The mediators are set up to talk with lawyers and the clients and it just seems like a great way to move forward. Even if the court system itself is clogged up.

Lewis Landerholm (07:18):

Yeah. I think the key for all of us is we want to be reasonable with the other party and try to maintain a sense of, especially when kids are involved, you know, we don't want these things dragging on for years or for months, if we can possibly do that. So getting creative, coming up with creative options, being as agreeable as possible are going to keep our cases moving forward and so that we can get clients to help that they want without it taking forever and bogging down in the system.

Steve, I know that you talked to a lot of our referral partners that we work with. You talked about experts and valuations and appraisals for homes. Are they doing the same thing? Are they able to work remotely and get all of those services done that are required?

Steve Altishin (08:09):

Absolutely. I was talking with an appraiser this afternoon, before we came on today. He is completely set up for remote work. He's a divorce specialist and he can not only remotely work with a client to gather the information, but then to also analyze it. Analyze it with not just the client, but with you, the attorney. So he'll set up a meeting with you and the client and he'll be able to gather a lot of information. So much of it now is able to be gathered remotely. He can evaluate it. You can get everybody online, he can get it all done and get it pushed forward.

It's the same thing with therapists. Therapists all over in all of the counties now are set up to do remote work. Child therapists, couples therapists, supervised visitation can be done remotely, which is really interesting. There are several other kinds of things that can be done remotely. Obviously all the filing can be done remotely. All the documents that need to be signed can be signed remotely. The services out there, I think because a lot of those services were traditionally moving to remote anyway, are up and ready to go. And we've got lists of virtually every type of service and not just the financial. We have house movers who are in that field of being able to really do everything in a remote setting. I mean, they can help people move and do it right now with all the protocols in mind. So we've got service people all over the place and they're up and ready to go.

And they're just waiting to get people ready and willing to say, "look, it's been a bad enough time. I want to move forward now. And I want to use the technology, all this new stuff".

Lewis Landerholm (10:18):

Yeah. I mean, totally. It makes sense. That's what we all have to do. It is what it is. And we just have to get creative and come up with creative solutions to all of the problems. And we're going to do the same thing from a legal perspective and a law firm perspective so that we can keep being able to serve the clients that we have and new clients that need the help so that it doesn't just bog down and just linger forever.

Steve Altishin (10:41):

It was interesting. One of the things you talked about, which I think is so vital is that this time, because there's a limited amount of ways you can make these things happen, people have to be more willing talk to each other, but it doesn't mean they have to settle the actual case. That's where you help. But people have to be willing to say, "okay, I don't want to talk to my spouse, but I will. I have to be able to move past that for the betterment, not only of our kids maybe, but to get the thing done." If people dig in their heels and say, you know, "I don't want to use this stuff", it isn't going to get done.

Lewis Landerholm (11:26):

Yeah. Like we talked about, it's just going to take a lot longer than it normally would. So the more that we can all work together and come up with solutions, it's going to make everybody feel happier about the process. Because it's not a fun process to begin with.

Steve Altishin (11:42):

No, it's not. You talked about the kind of alternative. Let's say the court is bogged down. Are there other ways you can deal with really minimal involvement with the court? Sort of alternative ways you can get some of these things processed and done?

Lewis Landerholm (12:00):

Yeah. I mean, even before all of this and the normal course of business, we always were settling cases outside of court. I don't know what the actual statistics are, but my guess is it's 98% of cases are settled outside of court. What this is going to do, it's just going to make that number go up even higher. There's going to be fewer access to judges, fewer court resources. And so the courts are going to be putting pressure to use these outside options, like the reference judges, like the judicial settlement conferences, like mediation. So those are all the normal things that we've always used, we're going to be using those in a much higher percentage of cases. 

And so we're going to be, from the very beginning, talking to clients about: how do we want to get to the end as opposed to what's going to happen at the end? Because now the process and the "how" is going to be much more important and at the forefront of everybody's minds when they first start. So we'll be problem solving that right out of the gate. 

Court is just not going to be as big of an option as it used to be. We'll still be able to use court for the immediate danger filings, you know, any of our emergency enforcement orders. Those things will still be able to move through, but the cases that are the normal course, you know, especially for support purposes, when somebody doesn't have money and they need support during the middle of the case, those we have to get filed ASAP and try to come up with a different way to get those numbers figured out. Because there's going to be a lot of people who get cut off and, especially with all of this, it's going to be extremely difficult.

Steve Altishin (13:52):

You talked about reference judges as potential alternatives. They can be a real help when you talk about kind of circumventing the traditional court process. I mean, don't they pretty much have the power to do whatever they want in terms of getting it settled where potentially, since you can't go into a courthouse, maybe to a trial, but you can use a reference judge? If you really need to get your divorce done, that may be a way to go.

Lewis Landerholm (14:28):

Yeah. Essentially they give us the option of having, say, when we have impasse: when we can't reach an agreement and it's a stepped up level from mediation, essentially where the parties delegate the authority to this judge to then make a ruling in the case. So that is an option that wasn't used as frequently before. But I think it's going to be much more common over the next, especially couple of years, until we get back into kind of the normal cycle of cases.

Steve Altishin (15:02):

So can you think of any specific areas of family law that are more, maybe, important to not delay? Because we hear that domestic violence is going up with people at home and a lot of people out there thinking "I just have to wait it out." What would you tell someone who's got a bad situation at home right now thinking there is no court solution?

Lewis Landerholm (15:33):

Well, obviously it depends on the facts and it depends on what's available. Just from a family law perspective, there are certain options. Restraining orders are still moving forward. The FAPA's, the family abuse prevention act restraining orders, those are continuing to be prioritized. Those have continued to move forward. So in the event that that is something that is necessary and required, that's still available. As far as emergency orders, like I mentioned, the immediate danger order as well, there’s a high bar for being able to get that order. But in those extreme circumstances, we'll still be able to get court time. Outside of that, I've talked to a lot of clients where one spouse, soon to be ex-spouse, is losing their job, and so they're contemplating moving. Well we can still get those status quos entered in place to slow everything down and to keep Oregon as the home state for the kids and for the parties so that things don't change more rapidly than somebody would want to change. So those are all still available and moving forward. And those are the really immediate things that are helpful. 

The other piece that I think is going to be important moving forward is the temporary hearings. A lot of times when something's been going on, say a couple has been separated for a year or so, and they've been going along and one party hasn't been getting as much parenting time and they want to change that or they need to get child support or spousal support, well, we need to file for a temporary hearing that then gives us those support orders and we can then change the parenting time. Well, typically that's a two to three months process to get a date on the calendar and to be able to move forward. Now, we don't know how long that's going to take, and that's really vital for a lot of people. And so coming up with solutions, and really embracing the technology, for those particular hearings is going to be extremely important so that we can get that relief for those clients.

Steve Altishin (17:40):

My understanding is that the courts are really also wanting to get this pushed forward and they are literally bending over backwards to try to get the attorneys to embrace just what we're embracing, which is these new technologies, these new video hearings. They’re offering to move people's cases up if they're willing to do a remote hearing and if so, they're willing to move some of their cases up. But what I understand is that it takes two to tango on this. There's always two parties and both parties need to say, "okay, yeah, we agree to this and we're going to do it this way". It seems like, again, that goes back to cooperation. You're not necessarily settling the final matter, but you're getting a push forward.

Lewis Landerholm (18:36):

Yeah. It's going to be, not just from the client perspective and the party's perspective, important for us professionals in the industry. Attorneys need to work together on how to problem solve ourselves so that we can use everything at our disposal to help move cases forward. We don't need to become part of the problem and cause issues. It's 2020, we can figure these things out.

We can figure out how to deal with evidence. We can figure out how to deal with remote hearings. We've got the technology, the courts have the technology and you know, there's going to be the majority of us who are going to work in that environment. And yeah, it's a little bit of a change but it could be great in the long run. And it could be that we're able to fast track a lot of these things because we're going to learn so much from using these alternative tools. 

So, in the long run, I think it's going to give the courts a huge advantage, hopefully, to be able to use their limited court resources and spread it amongst more people so that we can do things faster. But you know, those are all the things that we'll just have to wait and see. There are so many unknowns at this point.

Steve Altishin (19:53):

It seems like the old adage of “a journey of a thousand miles has to start with the first step”. And part of our job is going to be to relay and maybe convince people that they shouldn't wait. All of these great things that you talked about, all of these ways and strategies to move forward don't go anywhere until someone decides, "Yeah, I don't like the situation I'm in. I need to get out of it. I need to change it. Well, I have to start by actually doing it." You have to make that first step so that you can start to embrace all these opportunities.

Lewis Landerholm (20:33):

Yeah. And that's not unique to this time, you know what I mean? That’s always been something people have to decide for themselves. I always tell people, the part of the process that I don't advise on is the "when". I don't tell you when the time is to forward with something. 

Rather, when you decide that you need to move forward with something, we can help you, and we're going to help you embrace all of these tools that we have and try to solve the problem as efficiently and appropriately as we can. So none of that is new by any means, but it's definitely heightened. 

And I think uncertainty always causes people to worry and to not want to start to move forward in certain processes, which I completely understand. But the reality is that as we project that there's going to be a large wave of cases coming through in the next few months when everybody does decide to file, kind of getting your place in line becomes important. And just filing to get those dates, as they start to come out, is going to be important for people who do want their case to move forward.

And then we get into all of the other options to do it even faster. But yeah, it's an interesting time from a legal process perspective, but it's one that I think we're all going to deal with and we're all going to solve the right way.

Steve Altishin (21:56):

Well, like I said, it's something that we're evolving on. It's just part of what we're actually getting used to now. We're getting used to having to make some changes and a lot of the changes, as you said, we're learning as we go and we're learning a lot of new stuff. So, how do you think that this is going to work for the ultimate way that family law cases are handled, let's say one, five, 10 years from now?

Lewis Landerholm (22:27):

Well, I think that's an interesting question, and I think the legal system in general is slow to change, but this has brought upon an enormously quick, forced change. And I think we're just going to get better with technology and we're going to be able to move some of these hearings, which can then fast track the hearings so that we don't have to wait so long. I think this will help to kind of get out of the old school mentality to a certain extent that is, "this is the way it has to go". We're rewriting how it has to go now, and I think there are going to be a lot of positive things that come out of it in the long run.

Steve Altishin (23:06):

That's great. You know, sometimes terrible things can cause great things to happen. It's the way mankind has gone. So, it's been a great talk. Anything else you'd like to say at the end about someone out there who's listening and is thinking, "should I think about pulling the trigger? I mean, how should I get started?" How would they get started if they decided that, yeah, it is the time?

Lewis Landerholm (23:33):

I think the most important thing is to first be able to ask the questions and find out what it means if you do move forward. One of the things we did right off the bat is we reduced our consultation fee to free.

We didn't want somebody who did have questions to have any barriers, and to be able to find out some answers. It doesn't mean we answer every single inquiry, we don't have enough time to answer every single question. But it gives us the opportunity to talk to people about what it does mean, what it would look like, the process, how do we move forward. So, yeah, that's a great way to take advantage of our free consultation if you have those questions. Otherwise, there are resources out there online and with the courts as well.

Steve Altishin: (24:20):

Well, I love it. I think this is great. I think this is a lot of information. And again, if anyone has any questions or would like to get some more information, have them give us a call, would you give them some information on how to do that?

Lewis Landerholm (24:38):

Yeah, they can call our number at (503) 227-0200. That's probably the easiest way because then you'll get routed to the right person. Or you could email Steve, his email is steve@landerholmlaw.com, and he can get you pointed in the right direction as well. Whatever's easiest for you.

Steve Altishin (25:02):

That sounds good. And with that, I would also stress one thing we're doing: even if you're not ready to go to court, but you have some service you need, again, there's family therapy, there's financial planning, there's tax planning, there's moving, there's rental, maybe you have to move out. Issues that aren't yet ready for divorce that we can help with: you can call in. One of the things we've done in the last three months is get a brand new field of experts who are all set up now remotely to go. So that's a great thing. I'm going to wrap up the broadcast and if you've enjoyed it, that's great. We're going to do some more. We're going to try to do them on a bimonthly basis. We're going to try to do them about more timely issues. In this world right now, the concept of timeliness is so fluid a concept now that we need really need to, again, keep ahead of the curve. 

So please keep an eye out for these broadcasts. If you have a family law topic you'd like us to explore, please feel free to send us a suggestion. Again, my name is Steve, and my email is steve@landerholmlaw.com. You can send suggestions to me or put them on Facebook. 

Also, don't forget to follow our new broadcast modern family matters. We're going to be launching it next week, and it's aimed at addressing the myriad of real-life issues: legal, personal, financial, that touch and effect real families and real lives. So, as a reminder, really want to thank you again. Thanks for listening. This was our first one. We're going to do a bunch more. So stay well.

Steve Altishin (26:44):

Thank you, Lewis.

Lewis Landerholm (26:45):

Thanks Steve.

Outro (26:49):

You're listening to Modern Family Matters a legal podcast, focusing on providing real answers and direction for individuals and families as they navigate the growths, changes, and challenges of creating their new family dynamics. Modern Family Matters is sponsored by Landerholm Family Law, serving Oregon and the Pacific Northwest and devoted to providing clients with compassionate and fierce legal advocacy with a firm belief in the importance of upholding the family unit amidst complex transitions. If you are in need of legal counsel or have additional questions about a family law matter important to you, you can visit our Landerholm Family website www.landerholmfamilylaw.com, or call us at (503) 227-0200 to schedule a case evaluation with one of our seasoned attorneys. Modern Family Matters, advocating for your better tomorrow and offering solutions on legal matters, important to the modern family.

_________________________________________


Introducción

Bienvenidos a Modern Family Matters, un podcast presentado por Steve Altishin, nuestro Director de Relaciones con Clientes en Landerholm Family Law. Nos dedicamos a explorar los temas dentro del ámbito de derecho de familia que más le interesan. Discutiremos acerca de una amplia diversidad de asuntos legales y personales que acompañan los asuntos de derecho de familia. Creemos firmemente que algunos eventos que se dan en la vida tales como casarse, divorciarse, volver a casarse, tener un hijo, adoptar a un hijo, crecer, envejecer, enfermarse y morir no disuelven a una familia. Más bien, dan la oportunidad de reconfigurar y fortalecer la dinámica familiar de manera saludable y positiva. Con la experiencia de abogados calificados e invitados profesionales, esperamos que nuestros podcasts ayuden a resolver sus dudas, y a dar claridad y orientación para que usted y su familia tengan un futuro mejor. Sin más preámbulos, su anfitrión, Steve Altishin.

Steve Altishin (01:11):

Bienvenidos a todos a nuestra transmisión de Facebook Live. Mi nombre es Steve Altishin, Director de Relaciones con Clientes aquí en Landerholm Family Law, y estoy aquí con Lewis Landerholm. Lewis es el socio fundador de Landerholm Family Law y está aquí hoy conmigo para hablar sobre cómo hacer avanzar en su caso durante el ambiente actual. 

Antes que empecemos. Quiero animar a cualquiera que esté escuchando esta transmisión en vivo a enviar cualquier pregunta que tenga y haremos todo lo posible para responderlas al final de la transmisión. Además, si está interesado en aprender más sobre temas de derecho de familia, comenzamos un podcast llamado asuntos familiares modernos. Estos podcasts cubrirán una variedad de temas, como divorcio y custodia, adopción y planificación patrimonial. Puede obtener actualizaciones sobre nuevos episodios en nuestra página de Facebook, Instagram y la tienda de Apple.

 

Lewis, veo esta pregunta todo el tiempo: ¿de qué sirve solicitar el divorcio ahora, o un cambio de custodia o la ejecución de una sentencia? Es decir, los tribunales están cerrados. No se irá a ningún lado. ¿Cómo procedemos?

Bueno, creo que esa es una buena pregunta, Steve, solo desde el punto de vista de que no sabemos mucho, y el estado acaba de presentar algunas medidas nuevas y menos restrictivas en algunos de los condados. Así que sí, en este momento estamos como a la expectativa. Además, lo que hemos visto hasta este momento es que los tribunales realmente quieren poner en marcha algunos casos y audiencias.

Al principio, cuando todo esto sucedió, vimos que todas nuestras audiencias que estaban programadas desde mediados de marzo hasta junio fueron reprogramadas y aplazadas. Y todavía estamos esperando a que lleguen algunas de esas fechas, pero lo que se rumora es que veremos que el derecho penal y algunas de las órdenes de tipo más de emergencia serán priorizados por encima de algunos de nuestros casos de derecho de familia.  

Entonces, mientras los tribunales están tratando de hacerle frente a esto con los mandatos y las restricciones de los estados, están interesado en que los procesos se retomen para que podamos ayudar a las personas a avanzar en sus casos.

Steve Altishin (03:18):

Me parece que en realidad esta es una oportunidad para pensar en seguir adelante y ponerse al día. Lo que veo a mi alrededor es que hay abogados y personas que se muestran reacios a utilizar el nuevo sistema. O no tienen la tecnología o no cumplen con las reglas de la corte. Y entonces todavía tienen la mentalidad de, "bueno, esperemos hasta que comiencen las pruebas", y eso podría suceder dentro de un año. Así que me gusta mucho la idea de intentar avanzar y ser innovador. ¿Y de qué manera podemos hacerlo? ¿Cómo podemos usar la tecnología que tenemos a nuestro alcance y cómo nos preparamos para trabajar con el sistema judicial con peticiones, presentación de mociones, modificaciones y reducción de la aplicación de la ley? ¿Aún podemos hacer todas esas cosas?

Lewis Landerholm (04:10):

Sí. Creo que los juicios en los que necesitamos pruebas y testigos serán los más difíciles de resolver para los tribunales. Sé que otros estados lo han estado intentando, Michigan, Florida lo han hecho, y sé que Oregon también ha estado resolviendo algunos, en los que están tratando de hacer audiencias remotas. El desafío es tratar de lidiar con las dificultades de los asuntos probatorios y el testimonio de testigos. Entonces creo que lo que veremos es, bueno, nuestro objetivo es trabajar nuestros casos y hacer avanzar los casos de nuestros clientes de la manera más eficiente posible. Así que definitivamente aprovecharemos todas las ventajas tecnológicas para hacerlo. Llegaremos a la corte lo antes posible.

Creo que los tribunales también están haciendo cosas un poco creativas. Hay, además de las opciones de la corte, opciones que usamos todo el tiempo, incluso no solo en estas circunstancias, como, por ejemplo, si ahora mismo estamos anticipando el tiempo de espera como por un año, como mencionaste anteriormente, y no queremos esperar al juez. El uso de conferencias de acuerdos judiciales se ve mucho más. Las conferencias de acuerdos judiciales, para aquellos de ustedes que desconozcan al respecto, significa que iremos donde un juez diferente al que nos asignaron, para hablar con ellos sobre el caso, y explicarles los hechos. Y luego ese otro juez puede hacer recomendaciones o intentar resolver el caso. Las otras opciones que usamos todo el tiempo son la mediación asistida por un abogado, en la que contrataremos a un juez retirado para que nos ayude a superar el estancamiento y a trabajar para que los clientes lleguen a un acuerdo y se podamos avanzar con su caso. 

Incluso habrá más uso de un juez de referencia. Este es, principalmente, un juez que ha sido contratado, como lo sería un árbitro, alguien a quien llevamos nuestro caso. Y nos sometemos a permitirles tomar una decisión en el caso para que no tengamos que esperar un año. No tenemos que esperar 14 meses. Por lo tanto, existen muchas opciones y se volverán más frecuentes a medida que el sistema judicial se vuelva aún más contencioso y respaldado.

Steve Altishin (06:18):

Sin embargo, el sistema judicial podría volverse más polémico. Eso podría darse, ¿verdad? Una cosa que mencionaste, que he notado, y que es genial es que tenemos mediadores remotos a los que podemos referir a los clientes, con los que podemos trabajar. Tenemos varios. Entonces están listos para comenzar. Árbitros remotos, lo mismo, jueces de referencia remota, todos estos tipos de servicios se pueden brindar de forma remota.

No tenemos que preocuparnos por nada de eso. Por lo tanto, no están atrasados ​​y podemos llegar a ellos y hacer avanzar nuestro caso porque todos se han preparado de forma remota. Todos se puede hacer por video. Incluso de forma arbitraria, pueden mostrar evidencias vía video. Los mediadores están preparados para hablar con los abogados y los clientes, y parece ser una excelente manera de avanzar. Incluso si el mismo sistema judicial está paralizado.

Lewis Landerholm (07:18):

Sí. Creo que la clave para todos nosotros es que queremos ser razonables con la otra parte y tratar de mantener un sentido de, especialmente cuando hay niños involucrados, ya sabes, no queremos que estas cosas se prolonguen durante años o mese, si hay una posibilidad de que eso suceda. Por lo tanto, ser creativos, proponer opciones creativas, ser lo más agradables posible hará que nuestros casos sigan avanzando y podamos conseguir ayudar a nuestros clientes a que esto no les lleve casi una eternidad y que se atasque en el sistema.

Steve, sé que hablaste con muchos de nuestros socios de referencia con los que trabajamos. Hablaste de especialistas, valoraciones y tasaciones de viviendas. ¿Aún continúan haciendo todas estas cosas? ¿Pueden trabajar de forma remota y realizar todos los servicios necesarios?

 

Steve Altishin (08:09):

Absolutamente. Estuve hablando con un tasador esta tarde, antes de venir hoy. Está completamente preparado para trabajar a distancia. Es un especialista en divorcios y no solo puede trabajar de forma remota con un cliente para recopilar la información, sino también para analizarla. Y no solamente lo hace con el cliente, sino que también contigo, el abogado. Entonces, él concertará una reunión contigo y con el cliente y podrá recopilar mucha información, y mucha de esta información podrá ser recopilada de manera remota.  

Puede hacer la evaluación. Y organizar a todos, puede lograr todo eso y hacer que el caso avance.

Pasa lo mismo con los terapeutas. Los terapeutas de todos los condados ahora están preparados para realizar trabajo remoto. Los terapeutas infantiles, los de parejas, las visitas supervisadas se pueden realizar de forma remota, lo cual es realmente interesante. Hay varios otros tipos de cosas que se pueden hacer de forma remota. Obviamente, toda la documentación se puede archivar de forma remota. Todos los documentos que deben firmarse también se pueden firmar de forma remota. Los servicios que existen, creo que debido a que muchos de esos servicios de todos modos estaban innovando con el trabajo remoto, están activos y listos para funcionar. Y tenemos listas de prácticamente todos los tipos de servicios y no solo los financieros. Tenemos servicios de mudanzas que están en el campo de poder hacer todo realmente en un entorno remoto. Quiero decir, pueden ayudar a las personas a moverse y hacerlo ahora mismo con todos los protocolos en mente. Así que tenemos personal de servicio por todos lados y están listos para hacer lo que sea necesario. 

Y están esperando a que las personas estén listas y dispuestas a decir: "Ya es suficiente”. Quiero continuar con mi vida. Quiero usar la tecnología y adaptarme".

Lewis Landerholm (10:18):

Si. Quiero decir, tiene muchísimo sentido. Eso es lo que todos tenemos que hacer. Se debe hacer lo necesario. Y solo tenemos que ser creativos y encontrar soluciones creativas a todos los problemas. Y haremos lo mismo desde una perspectiva legal y una perspectiva de bufete de abogados para que podamos seguir sirviendo a los clientes que tenemos y a los nuevos clientes que necesitan la ayuda para no quedarse estancados.

Steve Altishin (10:41):

Ha sido muy interesante. Una de las cosas de las que hablaste, que creo que es muy importante, es que esta vez, debido a que hay una cantidad limitada de formas en las que puedes hacer que estas cosas sucedan, las personas deben estar más dispuestas a hablar entre ellas, pero no significan que deban resolver el caso. Es justamente ahí en donde las ayudas. Pero la gente tiene que estar dispuesta a decir: "Está bien, no quiero hablar con mi cónyuge, pero lo haré. Tengo que poder superar eso para mejorar, no solo para nuestros hijos, tal vez, sino para que se pueda trabajar en el caso". Si las personas se niegan a ser flexibles y dicen, ya sabes, "No quiero usar estas cosas", no se logrará nada.

Lewis Landerholm (11:26):

Sí. Como hablábamos anteriormente, tomará mucho más tiempo de lo que normalmente tomaría. Así que cuanto más podamos trabajar juntos y encontrar soluciones, todos se sentirán más felices con el proceso. Porque no es un proceso para nada divertido.

Steve Altishin (11:42):

No, no lo es. Hablaste del tipo de alternativa. Supongamos que nos encontramos en un escenario terrible.

¿Hay otras formas de lidiar con tener, aunque sea algo de participación en la corte? ¿Alguna forma alternativa de avanzar con los procesos y todo lo que debe hacerse?

Lewis Landerholm (12:00):

Si. Me refiero a que, incluso antes de todo esto y del curso normal de los negocios, siempre estábamos resolviendo casos fuera de los tribunales. No sé cuáles son las estadísticas reales, pero supongo que el 98% de los casos se resuelven fuera de los tribunales. Lo que esto provocará es que ese número aumente aún más. Habrá menos acceso a los jueces, menos recursos judiciales. Y entonces los tribunales ejercerán presión para que se usen estas opciones externas, como los jueces de referencia, las conferencias de arreglo judicial y la mediación. Esas son todas las cosas que siempre hemos usado, y ahora las usaremos en un porcentaje de casos mucho mayor.

Entonces, desde el principio, estaremos hablando con los clientes sobre: ​​ ¿cómo queremos llegar al final de todo en lugar de enfocarnos en qué es lo que sucederá al final? Porque ahora el proceso y el "cómo" serán mucho más importantes y estarán a la vanguardia de la mente de todos cuando comiencen. Así que resolveremos el problema desde el principio.

La corte simplemente no será la opción principal, como solía serlo. Aún podremos usar la corte para las presentaciones que deban hacerse inmediatamente, ya sabes, cualquiera de nuestras órdenes de ejecución de emergencia. Aún se podrá avanzar con ese tipo de cosas, pero los casos que continúan con su curso normal, ya sabes, especialmente para fines de apoyo, cuando alguien no tiene dinero y necesita apoyo durante la mitad de su caso, este tipo de casos deben ser presentados lo antes posible y se debe tratar de encontrar una forma diferente de dar con esos números. Porque habrá mucha gente que se quedará aislada y, especialmente con todo esto, será extremadamente difícil.

Steve Altishin (13:52):

Hablaste acerca de los jueces de referencia como posibles alternativas. Pueden ser de gran ayuda al momento de eludir el proceso judicial tradicional. O sea, ¿no tienen, el poder de hacer lo que quieran en términos de dónde, potencialmente, resolverlo, ya que no se puede ir a un tribunal, tal vez a un juicio, pero se puede usar un juez de referencia? Si realmente necesita terminar con su proceso de divorcio, esa podría ser una buena opción para considerar.

Lewis Landerholm (14:28):

Si. Básicamente, nos dan la opción de que cuando nos detenemos con el proceso: cuando no podemos llegar a un acuerdo y hay un nivel mayor de mediación, especialmente cuando las partes delegan la autoridad a este juez para luego tomar una decisión en el caso. Entonces esa es una opción que no se usaba con tanta frecuencia antes. Pero creo que será mucho más común en los próximos años, especialmente en un par de años, hasta que volvamos al ciclo normal de los casos.

Steve Altishin (15:02):

Entonces, ¿crees que hay áreas específicas del derecho de familia que sean quizás un poco más importantes y que no deben demorar? Porque escuchamos que la violencia doméstica está aumentando ahora que las personas pasan más tiempo en casa y mucha gente piensan que tienen que esperar para poder retomar sus asuntos. ¿Qué le dirías a alguien que está pasando por una mala situación en casa ahora mismo pensando en que no tendrán una solución judicial?

Lewis Landerholm (15:33):

Bueno, obviamente dependerá de los hechos y de lo que esté disponible. Existen ciertas opciones, solo desde la perspectiva del derecho de familia. Las órdenes de restricción siguen avanzando. Las FAPA, las órdenes de restricción de la ley de prevención del abuso familiar siguen teniendo prioritarias. Aquellos involucrados en estos asuntos han seguido avanzando. Entonces, en el caso de que sea algo necesario y requerido, todavía está disponible. En cuanto a las órdenes de emergencia, como mencioné, hay que pasar por mucho para obtener esa orden. Pero en esas circunstancias extremas, aún podremos conseguir tiempo en la corte. Aparte de eso, he hablado con muchos clientes en los que uno de los cónyuges, que pronto será excónyuge, ha perdido su trabajo y, por lo tanto, está contemplando mudarse. Bueno, todavía podemos lograr que se establezcan esos status quos para ralentizar todo y mantener a Oregon como el estado natal de los niños y las fiestas para que las cosas no cambien más rápido de lo que se quisiera. Así que estas cosas aún están disponibles y sus procesos continúan. Son inmediatas y bastante útiles. 

La otra pieza que creo que será importante en el futuro son las audiencias temporales. Muchas veces, cuando algo ha estado sucediendo, supongamos que una pareja ha estado separada durante un año más o menos, y han estado de acuerdo y una de las partes no ha tenido tanto tiempo de crianza y quieren cambiar eso o necesitan para obtener manutención de hijos o conyugal, bueno, tenemos que solicitar una audiencia temporal que luego nos dé esas órdenes de manutención y así podamos cambiar el horario de crianza. Bueno, normalmente es un proceso de dos a tres meses para obtener una fecha en el calendario y poder seguir adelante. Ahora, no sabemos cuánto tiempo llevará eso, y esto es realmente vital para mucha gente. Entonces, encontrar soluciones y usar la tecnología para esas audiencias en particular será extremadamente importante para que podamos brindar ese alivio a esos clientes.

 

Steve Altishin (17:40):

Tengo entendido que los tribunales también quieren impulsar esto y, literalmente, están haciendo todo lo posible para tratar de que los abogados acepten lo que estamos adoptando, las cuales son estas nuevas tecnologías, las audiencias por video. Que permiten a las personas continuar con sus casos si están dispuestos a hacer una audiencia remota y, de ser así, se procederá con algunos de sus casos. Pero lo que tengo entendido una sola persona no puede hacerse cargo de esto. Siempre hay dos partes y ambas partes deben decir, "está bien, sí, estamos de acuerdo con esto y lo haremos de esta manera". Parece que, de nuevo, eso se remonta a la cooperación. No necesariamente estarás resolviendo el asunto final, pero sería un gran avance.

Lewis Landerholm (18:36):

Si. Será importante para nosotros, los profesionales de la industria, y para los clientes. Los abogados debemos trabajar juntos sobre cómo resolver los problemas nosotros mismos para que hagamos uso de todo lo que tenemos a nuestra disposición para ayudar a que los casos avancen. No necesitamos convertirnos en parte del problema y causar complicaciones. Estamos en el año 2020, podemos resolverlo.

Podemos encontrar la manera de lidiar con lo de la evidencia.

Podemos hallar la manera de lidiar con las audiencias remotas. Contamos con la tecnología, los tribunales tienen la tecnología y ya sabes, la mayoría de nosotros trabajaremos en ese entorno. Y sí, es un pequeño cambio, pero podría ser genial a largo plazo. También es probable que podamos agilizar muchas de estas cosas porque aprenderemos mucho sobre del uso de estas herramientas alternativas.

Entonces, a largo plazo, creo que les dará a los tribunales la ventaja de que con un poco de suerte, puedan usar sus recursos judiciales limitados y puedan distribuirlos entre más personas para que podamos hacer las cosas más rápido. Pero ya sabes, esas son todas las cosas que tendremos que esperar y ver. Hay mucha incertidumbre en este momento.

Steve Altishin (19:53):

Suena mucho como al viejo adagio de "un viaje de mil millas tiene que comenzar con el primer paso". Y parte de nuestro trabajo será transmitir y tal vez convencer a la gente de que no deben esperar. Todas estas cosas maravillosas de las que hablaste, todas estas formas y estrategias para avanzar no sucederán hasta que alguien decide: "Sí, no me gusta la situación en la que estoy. Necesito salir de ella.” Necesito cambiar mi situación. Bueno, tengo que empezar a actuar. "Tienes que dar el primer paso para que puedas empezar a aprovechar todas estas oportunidades.

Lewis Landerholm (20:33):

Sí, y eso no es exclusivo de esta época, ¿sabes a qué me refiero? Eso siempre ha sido algo que la gente tiene que decidir por sí misma. Siempre le digo a las personas que la parte del proceso que no aconsejo es en qué momento deben hacer las cosas. No les digo cuándo es el momento de adelantar algo.

Más bien, cuando decidan que necesitan seguir adelante con algo, podemos ayudarles a adoptar todas estas herramientas que tenemos y tratar de resolver el problema de la manera más eficiente y adecuada posible. Así que nada de esto es nuevo, pero definitivamente ahora es mucho más común.

Y creo que la incertidumbre siempre hace que las personas se preocupen y no quieran empezar a avanzar en ciertos procesos, lo cual entiendo perfectamente. Pero la realidad es que, a medida que proyectamos que habrá una gran ola de casos en los próximos meses, cuando todos decidan presentar una demanda, obtener su lugar en la fila se vuelve importante. Y el simple hecho de presentar una solicitud para obtener esas fechas, a medida que comienzan a salir, será importante para las personas que desean que su caso avance.

Y luego utilizamos todas las otras opciones para agilizar el proceso aún más. Pero sí, es un momento interesante desde la perspectiva del proceso legal, pero creo que todos manejaremos y resolveremos el asunto de forma correcta. 

Steve Altishin (21:56):

Bueno, como dije, es algo en lo que estamos evolucionando. En realidad, es parte de todas las cosas nuevas a las que nos estamos acostumbrando en este momento. 

Nos estamos acostumbrando a tener que hacer algunos cambios y muchos de estos cambios, como mencionaste, aprendemos a hacerlos a medida que sobrellevamos la situación, y estamos aprendiendo muchas cosas nuevas. Entonces, ¿cómo crees que impactará la forma en la que tradicionalmente se llevan a cabo los procesos de caso de derecho de familia, en… unos 10 años?

Lewis Landerholm (22:27):

Bueno, creo que es una pregunta interesante, y creo que el sistema legal en general tarda en cambiar, pero esto ha traído un cambio enormemente rápido y forzado. Y creo que vamos a mejorar con la tecnología y podremos agilizar algunas de estas audiencias, para que no tengamos que esperar tanto. Creo que esto ayudará a salir de la mentalidad de la vieja escuela hasta cierto punto, es decir, "este es el camino para seguir". Estamos reescribiendo los procedimientos, y creo que surgirán muchas cosas positivas a largo plazo.

Steve Altishin (23:06):

Que genial. Sabes, a veces cosas terribles pueden hacer que sucedan cosas grandiosas. Es lo que ha ocurrido con la humanidad. Muy bien, ha sido una magnífica charla. ¿Algo más que te gustaría decir al final sobre alguien que pueda estarse preguntando, "¿debería intentarlo? Me refiero a que, ¿cómo debería empezar?" ¿Cuál sería el primer paso que las personas deben tomar en caso de que decidieran que este es el momento para actuar?

Lewis Landerholm (23:33):

Creo que lo más importante es poder hacer las interrogantes primero y descubrir qué conllevaría seguir adelante. Una de las cosas que hicimos desde el principio fue no cobrar por nuestras consultas y darlas de forma gratuita. 

Queríamos que si alguien tuviera preguntas pudiera hallar las respuestas sin ningún obstáculo. No significa que respondamos todas y cada una de las consultas, no tenemos tiempo suficiente para responder a todas las preguntas. Pero nos da la oportunidad de hablar con la gente sobre el proceso, su significado y la forma de ejecutarlo. Entonces, sí, esa es una excelente manera de aprovechar nuestra consulta gratuita si tienes estas preguntas. De lo contrario, existen recursos en línea y también en los tribunales.

Steve Altishin: (24:20):

Bueno, debo decir que me fascina. La verdad es que esto es grandioso. Creo que nos has brindado bastante información. Y nuevamente, si alguien tiene alguna pregunta o le gustaría obtener más información, pueden contactarnos, ¿podrías darles un poco de información sobre cómo hacerlo?

Lewis Landerholm (24:38):

Sí, pueden llamar a nuestro número al (503) 227-0200. Esa es probablemente la forma más fácil porque entonces te dirigirán a la persona adecuada. 

O pueden enviarle un correo electrónico a Steve, a: steve@landerholmlaw.com, y él también podrá guiarlos con los pasos para seguir, como les resulte más sencillo.

Steve Altishin (25:02):

Excelente. Y con esto, también quisiera enfatizar en una cosa que estamos haciendo: incluso si no está listo para ir a la corte, pero hay algún servicio que necesite, nuevamente, hay terapia familiar, planificación financiera, planificación fiscal, mudanzas, alquiler, tal vez tenga que mudarse, o quizás tenga asuntos que aún tenga que resolver para su proceso de divorcio con los que podemos ayudar: puede contactarnos. Una de las cosas que hemos hecho en los últimos tres meses es tener acceso a un nuevo grupo de expertos que ya están preparados para apoyarles de manera remota. Lo cual es simplemente genial. Terminaré con la transmisión, espero que la hayan disfrutado. Y no cosa más, intentaremos transmitir cada dos meses, para poder hablar acerca de los temas más relevantes. Actualmente, el concepto de puntualidad es un concepto tan fluido ahora que realmente necesitamos, una vez más, mantenernos a la vanguardia.

Así que estén atentos a estas transmisiones. Si les gustaría que habláramos de algún tema de derecho de familia en específico, no duden en enviarnos una sugerencia. Nuevamente, mi nombre es Steve y mi correo electrónico es steve@landerholmlaw.com. Pueden enviarme sugerencias o escribirlas en nuestra página en Facebook.

Además, no olviden seguir nuestra nueva transmisión de Modern Family Matters. Lo lanzaremos la semana que viene y tiene como objetivo abordar la gran cantidad de problemas de la vida real: legales, personales, financieros, que afectan y las vidas de familias reales. Entonces, como recordatorio, quiero agradecerles nuevamente. Gracias por su atención. Este fue el primero, haremos muchísimos más, así que, cuídense mucho. 

Steve Altishin (26:44):

Gracias, Lewis.

Lewis Landerholm (26:45):

Gracias, Steve.

Outro:

Está escuchando un podcast legal de Modern Family Matters, el cual se enfoca en brindar orientación y respuestas reales para las personas y las familias a medida que se enfrentan a nuevas etapas, cambios y desafíos en el proceso de su nueva dinámica familiar. Modern Family Matters cuenta con el patrocinio de Landerholm Family Law, que presta servicios en Oregon y el noroeste del Pacífico, y se dedica a brindar a los clientes una defensa legal integral y versátil con una firme convicción sobre la importancia de mantener la unidad familiar en medio de transiciones complejas. Si necesita asesoramiento legal o tiene preguntas adicionales sobre un asunto de derecho de familia importante para usted, puede visitar nuestro sitio web de la familia Landerholm: www.lamderholmfamilylaw.com, o llamarnos al (503) 227-0200 para programar una evaluación de caso con uno de nuestros abogados experimentados. Modern Family Matters, abogan por su futuro y ofreciendo soluciones para asuntos legales importantes para la familia de hoy.